MOVING FORWARD ON MARIJUANA: THE REASON WHY IT…DUDE, WAIT, I JUST HAD THE MOST AMAZING IDEA…DO YOU WANNA ORDER A PIZZA?

“How would life be if the world smoked weed/Guaranteed there’d be peace not greed/See, it’s hell/Living in a cell/Legalize the plant only time will tell.”
-Kottonmouth Kings, “Peace not Greed”

It has begun: the infestation of laziness and content and the unmotivated dreamers that spark great ideas, and then forget to do something about them.  They are waiting for the opportunity to come and break through their door, pick them off the couch, and make them millionaires.

I don’t like marijuana; I don’t like the smell and I particularly dislike the way people act on the substance.  I’ve personally never been under the influence, it’s just not for me, but it doesn’t mean I haven’t observed and experienced the actions of others.  I’ve found it interesting that more people cared about why I didn’t partake in pot than I cared of why they did.

After years of research I was unknowingly absorbing, I’ve also discovered that most marijuana users don’t believe they are affected by the drug.  However, it’s because they don’t see it from the sober perspective; they are normally hanging around people who are on the same mental wavelength.  The lines in a funny movie don’t change, and the notes a band plays don’t change; the mind is altered.  It’s the same mental concept an alcoholic eventually develops.  Just because the substance is natural that doesn’t mean it’s not bad for you; alcohol comes from natural ingredients, tobacco is natural, mushrooms are natural, and peyote is natural.  That’s more than high-fructose corn syrup can claim though.

The main chemical in marijuana is THC (delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol) which enters an individual’s blood stream before reaching the brain in seconds.  This interaction causes haziness, dilated eyes making colors more intense along with other senses becoming enhanced like hearing those certain notes a band plays, and eventually leads to paranoia.  THC mimics neurotransmitters and binds with cannabinoid receptors and activates neurons causing adverse effects on the mind and body.  Things like short-term memory, coordination, learning, and problem solving are puffed right out of the system (Bosner, 2013)).  That’s why people under the influence are constantly asking, “haha, what are you talking about, man,” have trouble transferring food from their hands to their mouth, cannot have a grammatically correct conversation, or simply take more than a minute to figure out how to get from one room to the next.

For more proof; I’m sure that most have suffered from side effects which are a prime example of the brain making the body aware that something is not normal.  For example: cotton mouth (is that why they named the band that?), nausea, vomiting, heart and blood pressure problems, impaired mental functioning (huh?), headache, dizziness, numbness, panic episodes, hallucinations, flashbacks, depression, and sexual problems.  It can also weaken the immune system, lead to emphysema or lung disease, enhance seizure disorders, and has a negative effect on the central nervous system (Webmd).  What doesn’t these days though?

It’s cool, man, we’re cool.  With all that being said, legalize the plant.  I will even gladly express the benefits that don’t include mild euphoria.

Colorado and Washington took great strides by passing the joint for recreational use in 2013 and 2014.  If you’re over 21 and live in-state you can purchase up to one ounce at a licensed distributor; out-of-state is a quarter-ounce.  You’re only allowed to smoke on private properties, and DUI laws are in effect (Martinez, 2014).  Essentially, don’t drive or go to work high; it’s common sense, but that can sometimes go up in smoke.  Let’s take a look at some benefits.

-Taxes: Retail weed will have a 25% tax, plus an additional 2.9% sales tax in the State of Colorado (Martinez, 2014).
-Over a third of the taxed revenue (estimated at $27.5 million) will go to building schools in Colorado (Martinez, 2014)
-More small businesses will open and boost local economy.
-More can be grown in the good ol’ U.S. of A. (maybe?).
-It will give drug cartels one less thing to push (maybe?).
-Slackers will finally have something to do; a person is allowed to grow up to six enclosed and locked plants in their home, but must be licensed to sell (Martinez, 2014).
-The police can concentrate more on real crimes.
-Pain relief: Medicinal weed still requires a physician’s recommendation, but won’t face additional taxes (Martinez, 2014).
-A healthier unhealthy alternative to unhealthy vices (huh?).
-People will stay home more and stop annoying the rest of the community (whom has the right to not allow marijuana stores in their jurisdiction (Martinez, 2014)).

he legalization may have an interesting take on society.  If legal, there’s no challenge or thrill anymore; just like after someone turns 21: they don’t have to rely on a brother or sister or homeless guy to buy alcohol for them.  That begs the question, what is next?  Why don’t we all just smoke some crack until that is legal, then meth and heroin until proven a resource, and then just start killing ourselves to cut out the middle man because suicide will eventually be accepted.

We have to draw the line somewhere, but the legalization of marijuana is not a big deal; it’s only a big deal if you make it one.  People escape reality, that’s just what they do.  Everyone who reads a book, sees a movie, listen to music, or watches reality television is escaping reality.  Let the stoners be stoned, the let the drunkards be drunk, and let the public be entertained if that’s what they want to legally do for recreation.  Once you start concentrating so much on what others are doing then you’re living in their reality and not your own.  Just another escape.

Smoking weed is not going to make the country a better place; it will probably make it dumber and even more vulnerable and dependent.  However, buying it will actually help out.  Whoa… wait (cough cough)…what?

Bosner, K. (2013). Retrieved from http://science.howstuffworks.com/marijuana3.htm on January 24, 2014.

Martinez, M. (2014). Retrieved from http://www.cnn.com/2013/12/28/us/10-things-colorado-recreational-marijuana/ on January 24, 2014

WebMd (2014). Retrieved from http://www.webmd.com/vitamins-supplements/ingredientmono-947-MARIJUANA.aspx?activeIngredientId=947&activeIngredientName=MARIJUANA on January 24, 2014

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